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LION’S MANE

Lion's Mane Mushroom has a long history of usage in traditional Chinese medicine for its positive effects on cognitive health [1]. This mushroom is rich in bioactive components, such as beta-glucans, which are responsible for some important physiological activities [2], this includes antioxidant, anti- inflammatory activities [3, 4] and neural growth [5], improving memory and focus as well as enhancing your dreams and mood [6]. 

CORDYCEPS

Cordyceps mushroom is an extraordinary mushroom, which has been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat fatigue, low libido and kidney disease [1]. More recent research of the bioactive compounds, in particular, cordycepin, show to promote anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-oxidative (anti-ageing) activities [2], as well as having beneficial effects on lipid metabolism [3] and improving your endurance to prolonged and high-intensity exercise [4, 5].

REISHI

For many millennia the Reishi mushroom has been used to treat a variety of diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and insomnia, mainly in Asian culture [1].  The Lanostane-type triterpenoids are a key constituent of the mushroom that help to enhance anti-microbial, anti-oxidant and immunomodulating activities [1, 2, 3, 4]. The mushroom is also well known for its beneficial effects on sleep and relaxation as it shows to have hypnotic/sedative type effects [5, 6]. 

TURKEY TAIL

The Turkey Tail mushroom is an extremely abundant mushroom and has been seen in Chinese medicinal literature for centuries. The polysaccharopeptide is a bioactive component found within the mushroom, which is frequently thought to regulate the immune system, as well as showing evidence of modulating the composition of the human microbiome, indicating that it can have prebiotic properties [1,2]. 

SHIITAKE

Besides their delicious taste, Shiitake mushrooms host an array of health benfits. They have been utilised as an edible and medicinal mushroom in Asia for many years due to their immune regulating activities promoted by the polysaccharide lentinan [1, 2]. In addition, the high level of amino acids and triterpenes help to reduce damage from UV light and stimulate the natural renewal process of the skin [3, 4, 5]. 

KAKADU PLUM

Kakadu plum is considered a gift of the Dreamtime by Aboriginal culture and has been an important bush food for millennia for people in Northern Australia. Used by Indigenous people to treat skin conditions and sores, or drunk as a tea for colds and flu.The fruit contains the highest recorded level of natural vitamin C content globally, and also displays superior antioxidant properties. 

RECOMMENDED SCHEDULE

 

AM


Cordyceps and Turkey Tail - add to coffee, tea or water
Shiitake is fine to have at any time.

 

PM
 

Reishi and Lion's Mane - add to evening tea or water
Shiitake is fine to have at any time.


Here's an example of a day in the life of a mushroom biohacker.

Inspired by Dave Asprey’s personal use


* Please note: Some of our community prefer to take Lion's Mane in the morning. As these mushrooms are adaptogens it is different for everyone.

Be sure to try out for yourself to find what works best for you

REFERENCES:

Lion’s Mane [1] Ying, C.-C. (1989). Icons of medicinal fungi from China. Beijing, China: Science Press [2] Friedman, M. (2015). Chemistry, Nutrition, and Health-Promoting Properties of Hericium Erinaceus (Lion’s Mane) Mushroom Fruiting Bodies and Mycelia and Their Bioactive Compounds. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 63(32), pp.7108–7123. [3] JIANG, S., WANG, Y. and ZHANG, X. (2016). Comparative studies on extracts from Hericium Erinaceus by different polarity reagents to gain higher antioxidant activities. Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 12(1), pp.513–517. [4] Mori, K., Ouchi, K. and Hirasawa, N. (2015). The Anti-Inflammatory effects of Lion’s Mane Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom, Hericium Erinaceus (Higher Basidiomycetes) in a Coculture System of 3T3-L1 Adipocytes and RAW264 Macrophages. International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, 17(7), pp.609–618. [5] Wittstein, K., Rascher, M., Rupcic, Z., Löwen, E., Winter, B., Köster, R. and Stadler, M. (2016). Corallocins A–C, Nerve Growth and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inducing Metabolites from the MushroomHericium coralloides. Journal of Natural Products, 79(9), pp.2264-2269. [6] Vigna, L., Morelli, F., Agnelli, G.M., Napolitano, F., Ratto, D., Occhinegro, A., Di Iorio, C., Savino, E., Girometta, C., Brandalise, F. and Rossi, P. (2019). Hericium Erinaceus Improves Mood and Sleep Disorders in Patients affected by Overweight or Obesity: Could Circulating Pro-BDNF and BDNF Be Potential Biomarkers? Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2019, pp.1–12.
Cordyceps [1] Ying, C.-C. (1989). Icons of medicinal fungi from China. Beijing, China: Science Press [2] Das, S.K., Masuda, M., Sakurai, A. and Sakakibara, M. (2010). Medicinal uses of the mushroom Cordyceps militaris: Current state and prospects. Fitoterapia, 81(8), pp.961–968 [3]  Kim, S.B., Ahn, B., Kim, M., Ji, H.-J., Shin, S.-K., Hong, I.P., Kim, C.Y., Hwang, B.Y. and Lee, M.K. (2014). Effect of Cordyceps militaris extract and active constituents on metabolic parameters of obesity induced by high-fat diet in C58BL/6J mice. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 151(1), pp.478–484. [4] Hirsch, K.R., Smith-Ryan, A.E., Roelofs, E.J., Trexler, E.T. and Mock, M.G. (2016). Cordyceps militaris Improves Tolerance to High-Intensity Exercise After Acute and Chronic Supplementation. Journal of Dietary Supplements, 14(1), pp.42–53. [5] Xu, Y.-F. (2016). Effect of Polysaccharide from Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes) on Physical Fatigue Induced by Forced Swimming. International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, 18(12), pp.1083–1092.
Reishi [1] Isaka, M., Chinthanom, P., Sappan, M., Supothina, S., Vichai, V., Danwisetkanjana, K., Boonpratuang, T., Hyde, K.D. and Choeyklin, R. (2017). Antitubercular Activity of Mycelium-Associated Ganoderma Lanostanoids. Journal of Natural Products, 80(5), pp.1361–1369. [2] Cilerdzic, J., Stajic, M. and Vukojevic, J. (2016). Potential of Submergedly Cultivated Mycelia of Ganoderma spp. as Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Agents. Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, 17(3), pp.275–282. [3] Wang, C.-H., Hsieh, S.-C., Wang, H.-J., Chen, M.-L., Lin, B.-F., Chiang, B.-H. and Lu, T.-J. (2014). Concentration Variation and Molecular Characteristics of Soluble (1,3;1,6)-β-d-Glucans in Submerged Cultivation Products of Ganoderma lucidum Mycelium. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 62(3), pp.634–641. [4] Gao, Y; Zhou, S; Huang, M; Xu, A (2013). Antibacterial and antiviral value of the genus Ganoderma P. Karst. species (aphyllophoromycetideae): A review. International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, [online] 5(3), pp.235–246. Available at: [5] Chu, Q.-P., Wang, L.-E., Cui, X.-Y., Fu, H.-Z., Lin, Z.-B., Lin, S.-Q. and Zhang, Y.-H. (2007). Extract of Ganoderma lucidum potentiates pentobarbital-induced sleep via a GABAergic mechanism. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 86(4), pp.693–698. [6] Cui, X.-Y., Cui, S.-Y., Zhang, J., Wang, Z.-J., Yu, B., Sheng, Z.-F., Zhang, X.-Q. and Zhang, Y.-H. (2012). Extract of Ganoderma lucidum prolongs sleep time in rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 139(3), pp.796–800. Turkey Tail [1] Pallav, K., Dowd, S.E., Villafuerte, J., Yang, X., Kabbani, T., Hansen, J., Dennis, M., Leffler, D.A., Newburg, D.S. and Kelly, C.P. (2014). Effects of polysaccharopeptide fromTrametes Versicolorand amoxicillin on the gut microbiome of healthy volunteers. Gut Microbes, 5(4), pp.458–467. [2] Yu, Z.-T., Liu, B., Mukherjee, P. and Newburg, D.S. (2013). Trametes versicolor Extract Modifies Human Fecal Microbiota Composition In vitro. Plant Foods for Human Nutrition, 68(2), pp.107–112.
Shiitake [1] Choi, J., Paik, D.-J., Kwon, D.Y. and Park, Y. (2014). Dietary supplementation with rice bran fermented with Lentinus edodesincreases interferon-y activity without causing adverse effects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Nutrition Journal, [online] 13(1). [2] Yamaguchi, Y., Miyahara, E. and Hihara, J. (2011). Efficacy and Safety of Orally Administered Lentinula edodes Mycelia Extract for Patients Undergoing Cancer Chemotherapy: A Pilot Study. The American Journal of Chinese Medicine, 39(03), pp.451–459. [3] Nachimuthu S., Kandasamy R., Ponnusamy R., Deruiter J., Dhanasekaran M., Thilagar S. (2019) L-Ergothioneine: A Potential Bioactive Compound from Edible Mushrooms. In: Agrawal D., Dhanasekaran M. (eds) Medicinal Mushrooms. Springer, Singapore [4] Bazela, K., Solyga-Zurek, A., Debowska, R., Rogiewicz, K., Bartnik, E. and Eris, I. (2014). l-Ergothioneine Protects Skin Cells against UV-Induced Damage—A Preliminary Study. Cosmetics, 1(1), pp.51–60.

These statements have not been evaluated by the TGA or FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. If you are on any medications please check with your GP/physician if they can be taken in conjunction with our products.